Articles tagged with: war and culture

Nov21

New open-access book

Categories // Blog

Lo sguardo lontano. L’Italia della Seconda guerra mondiale nella memoria dei prigionieri di guerra

For those who are interested in Italian history and the memories of prisoners of war (and for those who can read the Italian language), we are pleased to announce the publication of a new open-access book:

Lo sguardo lontano. L'Italia della Seconda guerra mondiale nella memoria dei prigionieri di guerra, by Erika Lorenzon (Edizioni Ca' Foscari Digital Publishing).

The book can be downloaded @

http://edizionicafoscari.unive.it/it/edizioni/libri/978-88-6969-268-0/

Apr20

Close Encounters in War Journal – n. 1 Call for articles

Categories // Blog, Journal

“Close encounters, displacement and war”

Issue n. 1 of CEIW Journal will aim to investigate the theme of close encounter in connection to the experience of displacement by exploring its facets both on a micro-scale, by studying individual testimonies and experiences, and on a broad scale by observing macro-phenomena of displacement throughout history with comparative, critical and cultural methodologies.

May22

Land of mine: an Ethical Example of Wisdom and Empathic Rationality

Categories // Blog, POWs, Meeting the other, Justice and punishment

By Patrizia Piredda

Land of mine: an Ethical Example of Wisdom and Empathic Rationality

Any violent act begets revenge when the agent believes that only by means of punishment grounded on the principle of an eye for an eye it is possible to act by justice and to restore peace. These ethical reflections are once more expressed in Land of Mine, a historical movie from 2015, directed by Martin Zandvliet and nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards in 2017.

Jan14

The War as Moral Experience in Wittgenstein’s Secret Diary

Categories // Blog, Human rights, War and culture, War and conflict

by Patrizia Piredda

When he stopped his studies of engineering in Manchester, Wittgenstein moved to Cambridge to study logic under the guidance of Bertrand Russell because he believed that by comprehending the fundamentals of language, and therefore the limits of language, he would understand its essence,   as well as that of human beings, in primis, himself. 

For Wittgenstein, knowing oneself was indispensable because only the man who knows himself can improve himself and become morally decent. When World War I broke out, Wittgenstein volunteered in the Austrian Army because he trusted “the fact that the experience of war would permit him to understand, beyond any fiction and illusion, who – which kind of man, so to say, – he really was. Thus, it was clarity and truth about himself that Wittgenstein expected from the war” (Perissinotto 13).

Jul08

What does ‘proximity’ mean for local interpreters working in zones of conflict?

Categories // Blog

María Manuela Fernández Sánchez

What does ‘proximity’ mean for local interpreters working in zones of conflict?

In this article María Manuela Fernández Sánchez gives us insights from her conversation with Spanish photographer and journalist Gervasio Sánchez, talking about his relationship with his interpreter in Iraq, Flayed Al Mayali, who was arrested by Spanish authorities for an attack on the Spanish military which occurred in November 2003:

Few professions have such discriminatory stereotypes as translators and interpreters. Very sadly, the Italian cliché traduttore, traditore is still thought to be true by many people. Nevertheless, both translators and interpreters have also contributed to the persistence of these stereotypes. 

The image was published in this article by abc.es in 2013.

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Normandy landings

Troups marching in France

General Bernard Montgomery

Pilots in World War II